Autograph Note Signed

Autograph letter and notes Albert Bushnell Hart- Harvard Prof. Note to Miss Reed

Autograph letter and notes Albert Bushnell Hart- Harvard Prof. Note to Miss Reed
Autograph letter and notes Albert Bushnell Hart- Harvard Prof. Note to Miss Reed
Autograph letter and notes Albert Bushnell Hart- Harvard Prof. Note to Miss Reed
Autograph letter and notes Albert Bushnell Hart- Harvard Prof. Note to Miss Reed
Autograph letter and notes Albert Bushnell Hart- Harvard Prof. Note to Miss Reed
Autograph letter and notes Albert Bushnell Hart- Harvard Prof. Note to Miss Reed
Autograph letter and notes Albert Bushnell Hart- Harvard Prof. Note to Miss Reed
Autograph letter and notes Albert Bushnell Hart- Harvard Prof. Note to Miss Reed
Autograph letter and notes Albert Bushnell Hart- Harvard Prof. Note to Miss Reed
Autograph letter and notes Albert Bushnell Hart- Harvard Prof. Note to Miss Reed
Autograph letter and notes Albert Bushnell Hart- Harvard Prof. Note to Miss Reed
Autograph letter and notes Albert Bushnell Hart- Harvard Prof. Note to Miss Reed

Autograph letter and notes Albert Bushnell Hart- Harvard Prof. Note to Miss Reed
18 pieces of paper from the estate of Professor of History at Harvard College, Albert Bushnell Hart (July 1, 1854- July 16, 1943) The preeminent historian on the history of the United States prior to and following the Revolution. There is a letter written on his Harvard College letter head to Miss Reed, who was Miss Helen Leah Reed, who attended Radcliffe College (at Harvard) and became a journalist for the Boston Transcript, wrote several books, taught, poet, and activist. Miss Reed had obviously asked Professor Hart for some suggestions as he fires off a list of reading materials for her. Hart also helped the famous W.

Du Bois deliver his famous paper "Reconstruction and its Benefits". He was a friend of Teddy Roosevelt. Although he believed the racial inferiority, he opposed it. Albert Bushnell Hart (July 1, 1854 - July 16, 1943) was an American historian, writer, and editor based at Harvard University. One of the first generation of professionally trained historians in the United States, a prolific author and editor of historical works, Albert Bushnell Hart became, as Samuel Eliot Morison described him, "The Grand Old Man" of American history, looking the part with his patriarchal full beard and flowing moustaches.

Hart was born in Clarksville, Pennsylvania (now known as Clark), and grew up in Cleveland, Ohio, graduating from West High School in 1870. He graduated from Harvard University in 1880.

While at Harvard, he was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and a classmate and friend of future U. He studied at Paris, Berlin, and Freiburg, and received his doctorate under Hermann Eduard von Holst at Freiburg in 1883. Harvard President Charles Eliot appointed Hart an instructor in 1883 to teach the only course in American history that the college offered, even though Edward Channing, already an assistant in European history, wanted to teach the course himself. In 1910 he was appointed Eaton Professor of the Science of Government.

He was on the Harvard faculty for 43 years, retiring in 1926. In retirement he continued to write and edit from a room in Widener Library. He maintained a summer home in New Hampshire near Mount Monadnock. In 1909, he played an important role in enabling his former student, W. Du Bois, to deliver his paper "Reconstruction and Its Benefits" to the AHA in New York.

This essay was elaborated as the book Black Reconstruction in America in 1935 and proved to be a seminal work in moving historical discussion of the Reconstruction period away from the views of the Dunning School. He served as a trustee of Howard University. Though a believer in the racial inferiority of African Americans, he nevertheless opposed plans to deny black students places in the Freshman Halls at Harvard in the years following World War I. Aside from being the advisor for Du Bois' doctoral dissertation, Hart was also the advisor (along with Edward Channing) for Carter G. Hart was also the initial doctoral advisor for another African-American historian, Charles H. Wesley, and arranged for Wesley to receive the same Austin Scholar Graduate Fellowship that Du Bois had received thirty years earlier; and as a Howard University trustee, Hart used his influence to secure Wesley a leave of absence so he could complete his doctorate. However, since Hart was on academic leave that semester, Channing served as Wesley's dissertation advisor. Participation in World War I, he was accused of espionage in December 1918, but the charges were determined to be the work of German propagandists trying to undermine his pro-British stance. In 1922, The Progressive Magazine referred to Hart as an Anglomaniac. Hart was a harsh critic of the practice in the Southern States of lynching. In December 1900, the New York World reported on Hart making a remark before the American Historical Association in Detroit to the effect that "if the people of certain States are determined to burn colored men at the stake, those States would better legalize the practice". In a similar vein he suggested in an article in the North American Review that Perhaps something might be accomplished by special courts set up on the model of similar tribunals in slavery times, with power to deal with certain aggravated crimes outside the technicality of ordinary criminal law. " Hart goes on in the same article to argue: "Lynching is approved by most Southern whites, as is shown by the fact that nobody has ever been severely punished for taking part in a lynching; but it is the worst and most ineffective of remedies for race troubles.

Lynchings frequently degenerate into mere orgies of blood. As a young Southern white says.

You don't understand how we feel down here: when there is a row, we feel like killing a n----- whether he has done anything or not. These extraordinary remedies are not necessary if the white people of the South will make their own courts and sheriffs do their duty. And disgrace and drive out of society men who take upon themselves the hangman's office. Hart wrote the entry on "Lynching" in Cyclopedia of American Government (1914), where he referred to it as not simply extra-legal but anti-legal.

It assumes guilt in many cases where guilt cannot be proved and, in some cases, where it does not exist; it sometimes includes manifestly innocent persons, as the negro woman who was burned at the stake by a mob because she had fled with her husband who had committed a crime. Whose "Brenda" stories are fast making her name a household word wherever there are young girls. Miss Reed was graduated from Boston schools, and then took the course at Radcliffe College, in the old days when it was still the " Harvard Annex/7 and she was the first young woman to win the Sargent Prize for the best translation from the Greek, After taking her degree from the " Annex, Miss Reed went on to the editorial force of the Boston Daily Advertiser, but after a few months resigned the place in order to devote herself to purely literary work. Since that time, however, she has done a good deal of desultory writing for the Boston Transcript, for Chicago papers, and for syndicates. Her first book was a novel, " Miss Theodosia " ; but in writing for girls, as she has done since, Miss Heed seems to have found her m├ętier, and is establishing a reputation for conscientious and painstaking, as well as fascinating, work.

Born: 15 March 1864, Saint John, Saint John County, New Brunswick, Canada Death: 21 July 1926, Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA (aged 62 years) Star sign: Pisces Education: Radcliffe College Her poem "The Shrieking woman at Marblehead" was inspired by a ghost story that takes place in Marblehead. The pirates killed everyone on board except for one person, a woman wearing jewels around her neck and on her fingers. She refused to give up her jewels to the pirates, and so they took her to shore at Lovis cove, where they chopped off her fingers to get to the rings, then killed her. She screamed for help, but her cries fell on deaf ears.

To this day, some say you can still hear her screams from Lovis cove! "The Shrieking Woman at Marblehead"'Twas a Spanish galleon sailed the seas, - Two centuries since have rolled - Laden with silver and gems to please Gay dames and gallants bold.

From Oakum Bay into Marblehead They brought one lady fair, - Her husband, alas, and his crew are dead, And her they will not spare. Get images that make Supersized seem small. This item is in the category "Collectibles\Historical Memorabilia\Teaching & Education\Colleges & Universities". The seller is "angelzgrace" and is located in this country: US. This item can be shipped to United States, all countries in Europe, Canada, Japan, Australia, China, Korea, South, Indonesia, Taiwan, South Africa, Thailand, Hong Kong, Bahamas, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Malaysia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Panama, Trinidad and Tobago, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Saint Kitts-Nevis, Saint Lucia, Montserrat, Turks and Caicos Islands, Barbados, Bangladesh, Bermuda, Brunei Darussalam, Bolivia, Egypt, French Guiana, Guadeloupe, Jordan, Cambodia, Cayman Islands, Sri Lanka, Macau, Martinique, Maldives, Nicaragua, Oman, Pakistan, Paraguay, Reunion, Uruguay.

  • Albert Bushnell Hart: 185.00
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United States
  • Modification Description: Notes and autograph
  • Modified Item: Yes
  • Signed: Yes
  • Original/Reproduction: Original
  • Theme: Colleges & Universities
  • Year: 1889


Autograph letter and notes Albert Bushnell Hart- Harvard Prof. Note to Miss Reed