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Louis Smith Jazz Trumpeter Report Card African American Blue Note Memphis

Louis Smith Jazz Trumpeter Report Card African American Blue Note Memphis
Louis Smith Jazz Trumpeter Report Card African American Blue Note Memphis

Louis Smith Jazz Trumpeter Report Card African American Blue Note Memphis

A fantastically rare very rare report card for. JUNIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SHOOL. Edward (Louis) Smith a Blue Note Trumpeter.

He died in Ann Arbor, Michigan and was a big part of the University of Michigan school of music. Edward Louis Smith (May 20, 1931 - August 20, 2016) was an American jazz trumpeter from Memphis, Tennessee. Louis graduated from Manassas High School, where he was a member of the Manassas High School Rhythm Bombers, in 1948. Louis went on to attend Tennessee State University, where he was a member of the famed Tennessee State Collegians, and performed at Carnegie Hall with Lionel Hampton, Billy Eckstein, and Sarah Vaughn.

Louis graduated from Tennessee State with a Bachelor of Science in Music and was drafted into the United States Army where he played in the Special Services Band. After graduating from Tennessee State University he attended graduate school at the University of Michigan. While studying at the University of Michigan, he played with visiting musicians such as Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, Thad Jones and Billy Mitchell, [1] before going on to play with Sonny Stitt, Count Basie and Al McKibbon, Cannonball Adderley, Percy Heath, Philly Joe Jones, Lou Donaldson, Donald Byrd, Kenny Dorham and Zoot Sims.

Smith decided to forgo being a full-time musician to take a job a director of Atlanta's Booker T. There he recorded two albums for Blue Note. REPORT CARD SIGNED BY PARENT, TEACHER ETC. Smith, Louis 5/20/1931 - 8/20/2016 Ann Arbor Edward Louis Smith was born May 20, 1931 in Memphis, TN to Walter Smith and Betty Little-Smith. Betty liked to tell the story about how Louis would practice playing his horn and how he played so loud and he sounded so bad that the neighbors would complain.

One night the police were called to the Smith residence. However, Betty and Walter were able to convince the police that one day Louis would become a great musician, and with that, the police told the neighbors to stop complaining and leave the boy alone because one day he's going to be great. Walter was determined to help Louis to establish a solid musical foundation, and while Louis was still a teenager, his father would take him to Beale St.

For nightly jam sessions where Louis would spend a great deal of time watching, listening, and sitting in with the great jazz and blues musicians of the time. Later, as we all know, this would become his life. In 1955, following his tour of duty, Louis decided to pursue a more stable career as an educator in Atlanta, Georgia.

Since then, Louis has taught music, and served as a band director at Tennessee State University, Kentucky State University, and the University of Michigan. Louis also served as a music teacher, and band instructor with the Ann Arbor Public Schools from 1968 to 1993.

Louis signed his first recording contract with Blue Note Records in 1957, and released, Here Comes Louis Smith. " Shortly after the release of his second album, "Smithville, he joined the Horace Silver Quintet, in 1958.

Louis' daughter Edwaa Smith was born August 2, 1962. In 1968, while teaching music and band at Forsythe Junior High School in Ann Arbor Michigan, he met teaching colleague, Harriet L. Louis and Lulu were married in 1976.

Louis continued to perform and record throughout his teaching career and his marriage to Lulu. In 1990, due to unforeseen circumstances, it became necessary for Louis and Lulu to take temporary custody of their grandchildren Michael D. Louis and Lulu raised their grandchildren for the following two years until turning them over to the care and custody of their dad, who continued on as a single father for the next 15 years, with the assistance of Louis and Lulu each and every summer. Louis served as the Director of Jazz Bands at the University of Michigan from 1971 to 1987. Louis performed as a staff musician with Motown Records, traveled and recorded with greats such as, the Temptations and Marvin Gaye, Ashford and Simpson, and many others.

He was featured on the classic R&B recordings, "Papa was a Rolling Stone, " and What's Going On. In 1978, Louis signed his next recording contract with Steeplechase Records, where he released a total of 12 albums. Louis has performed at the Montreux (Switzerland) and Nice (France) Jazz Festivals, as well as, 25 consecutive years at the International Detroit Jazz Festival.

Louis taught jazz improvisation in Montreux, Switzerland, Tuebegin, Germany, LaHague, Netherlands, and the Eastman School of Music. Louis has facilitated jazz clinics at numerous high schools and colleges, as well as, the Annual Conference of the International Association of Jazz Educators. Louis is a former president of the Michigan Chapter of the International Association Jazz Educators, and was in charge of adjudications for the Montreux-Detroit Jazz Festival. Louis has performed in live concerts at numerous venues including Carnegie Hall, Birdland, Newport Jazz Festival, Grande Parade du Jazz, St.

Petersburg, Moscow, and the Netherlands. In 2005 while vacationing in Hilton Head, Virginia, Louis suffered a massive stroke leaving him partially paralyzed and aphasic.

Louis' career in music and education abruptly came to an end and he and Lulu began the journey down the long road of recovery. Although, Louis was never able to completely regain the power of speech, he nevertheless made some progress in his ability to play his trumpet. For the next eleven years, Lulu was his sole caretaker. On the morning of Saturday, August 20, 2016, it was the last curtain call for Louis. He passed away at the Glacier Hills Rehabilitation Center as he was preparing for his occupational therapy session.

Smith is survived by his wife Harriet L. Smith (Lulu); daughter, Edwaa Smith; son, Michael D. Grandson, Maurice Cumberbatch; grandson, Michael D. Granddaughter, Tiffany Collins; and great-granddaughters, Louise "Lulu" Collins and Alexia Cumberbatch. We're all going to miss you so much Pops. [1] Smith decided to forgo being a full-time musician to take a job a director of Atlanta's Booker T. The first, Here Comes Louis Smith, originally recorded for the Boston-based Transition Records, featured Cannonball Adderley (then under contract to Mercury) playing under the pseudonym "Buckshot La Funke", [2] Tommy Flanagan, Duke Jordan, Art Taylor and Doug Watkins.

He also replaced Donald Byrd for Horace Silver's Live at the Newport 1958 set. His playing on the set was one of his best efforts and was described by one critic as "monstrous". He was a prolific composer and successful band director leaving Booker T. Washington to become director of the Jazz Ensemble at the University of Michigan and a teacher in Ann Arbor's public school system. He later recorded for the SteepleChase label.

Smith suffered a stroke in 2006, and was seen occasionally enjoying live jazz in the Detroit/Ann Arbor area, but did not return to performing. His cousin Booker Little was also a trumpeter. Smith died on August 20, 2016, at age 85.

1958: Here Comes Louis Smith (Blue Note). 1978: Just Friends (SteepleChase, 1978). 1990: Ballads for Lulu (SteepleChase). 1994: Strike up the Band (SteepleChase). 1995: The Very Thought of You (SteepleChase). 1996: I Waited for You (SteepleChase). 1997: There Goes My Heart (SteepleChase). 2000: Once in a While (SteepleChase).

Swingin' Blue Note, 1956 rel. Blue Lights Volume 1 (Blue Note, 1958).

Blue Lights Volume 2 (Blue Note, 1958). Live at Newport'58 (Blue Note, 1958 [2003]). With Booker Little and Young Men From Memphis. Down Home Reunion (United Artists, 1959 Fresh Sounds 1642). Many factors have shaped jazz in Ann Arbor, but trumpeter and educator Louis Smith has to be at the top of the list for modern jazz and education.

Sean Dobbins, Rick Roe, Justin Walter and Ingrid Racine will testify to his grace, wisdom, strength and total honesty as a teacher. He encouraged a professional attitude and exponential musical growth from middle school students. His students could play rings around others years older!

Jazz fans recognized the presence of mastery when Louis put his horn to his lips whether to play lightning speed bebop or a languid, loving ballad. Louis represented Ann Arbor around the globe through his recordings for Steeplechase Records and participation at International Association Of Jazz Educator Conferences. Even with these accomplishments, I remember that Louis Smith was taking trumpet lessons after retirement from the Ann Arbor Public Schools. He wanted to improve his "long tones" and strengthen his embouchure.

His presence on the bandstand was warm, inclusive and intelligent. He never talked down to you. Yet, you always learned something from Louis Smith and Louis was always learning more about his craft. Even after his stroke, Louis continued to learn and share life lessons. His determination to live with dignity, purpose and creativity continued with great support from his generous, supportive wife Lulu and the University Of Michigan Aphasia team.

Louis and Lulu attended UMS, Kerrytown and Detroit Jazz Festival events after his stroke. If Louis couldn't play with his former bravado, he could listen and love the music along with others. And, without fail, the concert host would acknowledge the presence of greatness in the house: Louis Smith. Louis, who was always attired in first-class style, would then raise his big hand, wave, grin and make eye contact with music friends.

Despite aphasia, Louis Smith communicated. Louis' legacy lives on with his legion of students, his impressive Blue Note and Steeplechase Records, his contributions to jazz education on a national level and his beautiful smile that included twinkling eyes. I'll never forget him. If you ever met him or spent time with him, you'll agree with me.

If you haven't heard his music, youtube has many classic Blue Note sessions available. Listen and learn why trumpeters such as Nicholas Paytonand Brian Lynch count Louis Smith as a significant influence. His influence on jazz in Ann Arbor was beyond significant. Louis Smith, trumpet; Cannonball Adderley as "Buckshot La Funke", alto sax; Duke Jordan, piano; Doug Watkins, bass; Art Taylor, drums. Audio Sonic Sound, NYC, February 4, 1958.

Transition TRLP 30; Blue Note 45-1701, BLP 1584. Transition TRLP 30; Blue Note 45-1700, BLP 1584. Transition TRLP 30; Blue Note BLP 1584. Transition TRLP 30 Here Comes Louis Smith (not released). Blue Note BLP 1584, CDP 7243 8 52438 2 0 Here Comes Louis Smith. Blue Note 45-1701 Louis Smith - Tribute To Brownie / Star Dust. Blue Note 45-1700 Louis Smith - Brill's Blues, Part 1 & 2. Louis Smith, trumpet; Cannonball Adderley as "Buckshot La Funke", alto sax #1,3; Tommy Flanagan, piano; Doug Watkins, bass; Art Taylor, drums. Audio Sonic Sound, NYC, February 9, 1958. Louis Smith, trumpet; Charlie Rouse, tenor sax; Sonny Clark, piano; Paul Chambers, bass; Art Taylor, drums. Van Gelder Studio, Hackensack, NJ, March 30, 1958. There Will Never Be Another You. Blue Note 45-1715, BLP 1594. Blue Note (J) BNJ-61008/10 Various Artists - The Other Side Of Blue Note 1500 Series. Blue Note BLP 1594 Louis Smith - Smithville.

Blue Note 45-1715 Louis Smith - Smithville, Part 1 & 2. Louis Smith, trumpet, flugelhorn; George Coleman, tenor sax; Harold Mabern, piano; Jamil Nasser, bass; Ray Mosca, drums. SteepleChase (D) SCS-1096, SCCD-31096 Louis Smith Quintet - Just Friends. Louis Smith, trumpet, flugelhorn; Junior Cook, tenor sax; Roland Hanna, piano; Sam Jones, bass; Billy Hart, drums. I Can't Get Started.

SteepleChase (D) SCS-1121, SCCD-31121 Louis Smith Quintet - Prancin. Louis Smith, trumpet; Jim McNeely, piano; Bob Cranshaw, bass; Keith Copeland, drums.

Smoke Gets In Your Eyes. SteepleChase (D) SCCD-31268 Louis Smith Quartet - Ballads For Lulu.

Louis Smith, trumpet, flugelhorn; Vincent Herring, alto sax; Junior Cook, tenor sax; Kevin Hays, piano; Steve LaSpina, bass; Leroy Williams, drums. SteepleChase Digital Studio, August, 1991. SteepleChase (D) SCCD-31294 Louis Smith Sextet - Strike Up The Band.

Louis Smith, trumpet, flugelhorn; Von Freeman, tenor sax; Jodie Christian, piano; Eddie De Haas, bass; Wilbur Campbell, drums. SteepleChase Digital Studio, April, 1993. You Don't Know What Love Is. SteepleChase (D) SCCD-31336 Louis Smith Quintet - Silvering.

Louis Smith - Jodie Christian Duo. Louis Smith, trumpet; Jodie Christian, piano. SteepleChase Digital Studio, October, 1994.

Don't Take Your Love Away From Me. I Will Wait For You. The Very Thought Of You. SteepleChase (D) SCCD-31361 Louis Smith & Jodie Christian - The Very Thought Of You. Louis Smith, trumpet; Vincent Herring, alto, tenor sax; Richard Wyands, piano; Dennis Irwin, bass; Kenny Washington, drums.

SteepleChase Digital Studio, November, 1995. SteepleChase (D) SCCD-31385 Louis Smith Quintet - I Waited For You. Louis Smith, trumpet; Bruce Williams, alto sax; George Cables, piano; Jay Anderson, bass; Al Harewood, drums.

SteepleChase Digital Studio, March, 1997. SteepleChase (D) SCCD-31415 Louis Smith Quintet - There Goes My Heart.

Louis Smith, trumpet; Jimmy Greene, tenor sax; Andy LaVerne, piano; Jay Anderson, bass; Billy Drummond, drums. All God's Children Got Rhythm. SteepleChase (D) SCCD-31442 Louis Smith - Soon.

Louis Smith, trumpet; Doug Raney, guitar; Hugo Rasmussen, bass; Keith Copeland, drums. Audiophon Recording Studio, Allerod, Denmark, May, 1998.

Once I Had A Secret Love. There Is No Greater Love. SteepleChase (D) SCCD-31464 Louis Smith - Once In A While. Louis Smith, trumpet; Jon Gordon, alto sax; Michael Weiss, piano; Jay Anderson, bass; Joe Farnsworth, drums. The Way You Look Tonight.

A Ghost Of A Chance. SteepleChase (D) SCCD-31489 Louis Smith - The Bopsmith.

Louis Smith, trumpet; Jon Gordon, alto sax; Michael Cochrane, piano; Calvin Hill, bass; Jeff Hirshfield, drums. I'll Close My Eyes. Days Of Wine And Roses. SteepleChase (D) SCCD-31552 Louis Smith Quintet - Louisville. Louis Smith was a talented, but underrecorded, straight-ahead bop trumpeter who led two dates in the'50s before retiring to teach at the University of Michigan and the nearby Ann Arbor Public School system. For most of his career, he remained a teacher, making a brief comeback in the late'70s before returning to education. It wasn't until the mid-'90s that he began a recording career in earnest, turning out a series of albums for the Steeplechase label.

A native of Memphis, TN, Louis Smith began playing trumpet as a teenager. He graduated high school with a scholarship to Tennessee State University, where he studied music and became a member of the Tennessee State Collegians. Following his college graduation, Smith did a little graduate work at Tennessee before transferring to the University of Michigan, where he studied with professor Clifford Lillya.

At Michigan, he had opportunities to play with traveling musicians, including Miles Davis and Dizzy Gillespie. In January 1954, Smith was drafted into the Army, spending a little over a year-and-a-half in his tour of duty. Once he left the Army in late 1955, he began teaching at the Booker T. Washington High School in Atlanta, GA.

While teaching at Booker T. Washington, Smith continued playing bop and hard bop in clubs, and was able to jam with Cannonball Adderley, Kenny Dorham, Donald Byrd, Lou Donaldson, Zoot Sims, and Philly Joe Jones, among many others.

In 1956, he made his recording debut as a sideman on Kenny Burrell's Swingin'. A year later, he had the opportunity to lead his own recording session for Tom Wilson's Boston-based label, Transition. He assembled a quintet featuring Cannonball Adderley (who performed under the pseudonym Buckshot La Funke), bassist Doug Watkins, drummer Art Taylor, and pianists Duke Jordan and Tommy Flanagan, who alternated on the date.

Transition went out of business before the label had the chance to release the record. During 1958, the trumpeter played on two Blue Note sessions - Kenny Burrell's Blue Lights and Booker Little's Booker Little 4 and Max Roach - in addition to leading the date that became Smithville. That brief burst of activity turned out to be his only recording dates for 20 years. Smith moved back to the Ann Arbor, MI area, where he taught at the University of Michigan and public schools.

Between 1978 and 1979, he cut a pair of albums - Just Friends and Prancin' - before returning to teaching. A decade later, Smith began his recording career in earnest. After playing on Mickey Tucker's Sweet Lotus Lips in 1989, he signed with Steeplechase and recorded Ballads for Lulu in 1990. He didn't return to the studio for another four years, but he did record two albums - Silvering and Strike Up the Band - in 1994. The Very Thought of You appeared in 1995.

A year later, Smith recorded I Waited for You, which was followed by There Goes My Heart in 1997. Retired from teaching, Smith suffered a stroke in 2006, and is in convalescence at home, but is recovering.

Here Comes Louis Smith is the debut album by American trumpeter Louis Smith recorded in 1958 and released on the Blue Note label. [1] Originally recorded for the Transition label, the company went out of business shortly afterwards and before the recording could be released. The album masters were acquired by Blue Note's Alfred Lion.

The Allmusic review by Scott Yanow awarded the album 4½ stars and stated: Louis Smith had a brilliant debut on this Blue Note album, his first of two before becoming a full-time teacher. All compositions by Louis Smith except as indicated. "Tribute to Brownie" (Duke Pearson) - 6:38. "Brill's Blues" - 8:22. "Stardust" (Hoagy Carmichael) - 5:20. "South Side" - 8:38. "Val's Blues" - 6:37. Cannonball Adderley (credited as "Buckshot La Funke") - alto saxophone (tracks 1-3, 5 & 6). Tommy Flanagan (tracks 3, 4 & 6), Duke Jordan (tracks 1, 2 & 5) - piano. Louis Smith was a talented but under-recorded straight-ahead bop trumpeter who led two dates in the'50s before retiring to teach at the University of Michigan and the nearby Ann Arbor Public School system.

It wasn't until the mid-'90s that he resumed a recording career in earnest, turning out a series of albums for the Steeplechase label. A native of Memphis, Tennessee, Smith began playing trumpet as a teenager.

In January 1954, Smith was drafted into the Army, spending a little over a year and a half in his tour of duty. Washington High School in Atlanta, Georgia. Here Comes Louis SmithIn 1956, he made his recording debut as a sideman on Kenny Burrell's Swingin'. A year later, he had the opportunity to lead his own recording session for Tom Wilson's Boston-based Transition label. During 1958, the trumpeter played on two Blue Note sessions -- Kenny Burrell's Blue Lights and Booker Little's Booker Little 4 and Max Roach -- in addition to leading the date that became Smithville.

Just FriendsSmith moved back to the Ann Arbor, Michigan area, where he taught at the University of Michigan and public schools. Between 1978 and 1979, he cut a pair of albums -- Just Friends and Prancin' -- before returning to teaching. A decade later, Smith resumed his recording career in earnest. He didn't return to the studio for another four years, but he did record two albums -- Silvering and Strike Up the Band -- in 1994.

Retired from teaching, Smith suffered a stroke in 2006, and subsequently became a regular presence among audience members at Southeastern Michigan jazz venues but did not return to performing or recording. He died in Ann Arbor in August 2016.

An 80th birthday tribute planned for jazzman Louis Smith Saturday night will include plenty of great bebop and, of course, a cake. Smith, the much-loved Ann Arbor trumpeter and music educator, would love it if friends would stop by and say hello at the concert, put on by the Paul Keller Ensemble.

The group plans to perform some of Smith's compositions, as well as other works at their new home, the Zal Gaz Grotto Club. A stroke in 2005 slowed Smith, but didn't stop him, said his wife, LuLu Smith, herself recovering from some recent surgery. Rehabilitation continues, and although he has difficulty speaking, he is able to walk without a cane, and has also been able to sing.

We're just thrilled he's doing as well as he can at 80 and after that severe stroke. It was completely debilitating to him, and he's made a miraculous recovery, said Keller.

Louis Smith 80th Birthday Tribute. Who: The Paul Keller Ensemble (bassist Paul Keller, pianist Duncan McMillan, drummer Sean Dobbins, trumpeter Paul Finkbeiner, saxophonist Doug Horn, trombonist Chris Smith and vocalist Sarah D'Angelo). What: Birthday celebration for educator, recording artist and trumpeter Louis Smith. Tunes by Smith, Dizzy Gillespie, Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Art Blakey and more.

Sarah D'Angelo will sing gems from the Great American Songbook. Where: Zal Gaz Grottolub, 2070 W. Besides bassist Keller, the ensemble consists of pianist Duncan McMillan, drummer Sean Dobbins, trumpeter Paul Finkbeiner, saxophonist Doug Horn and trombonist Chris Smith.

Sarah D'Angelo, from Belleville, is the group's new vocalist (long-time singer Susan Chastain has relocated to Florida). This is really just a chance for everybody to meet and greet Louis and wish him a happy birthday personally.

We'll have a cake, we'll play a few of his tunes, but it's not going to be a whole night of Louis Smith music. Sarah is going to do some of her stuff, Paul Finkbeiner will be playing trumpet, and I know that's going to make Louis happy, to have a good jazz trumpeter there. The PKE will play a variety of original sextet charts by Keller and his bandmates in the classic jazz style. Selections will include tunes by Smith, Dizzy Gillespie, Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers.

D'Angelo will sing familiar gems from the Great American Songbook. This show will be the first chance many area jazz fans will have to hear D'Angelo, Keller noted. Louis Smith was a recording artist for the prestigious Blue Note label. During his career, Smith, a former artist on the Blue Note label (among his albums are the acclaimed "Here Comes Louis Smith" and "Smithville"), performed with artists such as Miles Davis, Blakey and Gillespie.

After he retired from performing, he settled in Ann Arbor, where he taught for many years at the University of Michigan and in the Ann Arbor public schools, influencing countless young musicians. "We will be playing a few of his famous compositions from some of his Blue Note records from the late'50s that he made with Cannonball Adderly, Art Taylor and Paul Chambers, " Keller added. In addition, two of the band members - Chris Smith and Sean Dobbins - are former bandmates of Smith and plan to offer short testimonials. In the jazz pantheon, Louis Smith is right there as one of the greats.

He was touted as being the next Clifford Brown. He's dyed in the wool bebop, Keller said.

(He) could have lived anywhere and become a major trumpet star in New York or Paris or wherever, but he chose to live in Ann Arbor. He wanted to come off the road and teach - he decided to make a positive contribution to the lives of thousands of music students. Ann Arbor has been fortunate to have had him living in this area for 30 years. He's a pillar of our community. This item is in the category "Collectibles\Autographs\Historical".

The seller is "memorabilia111" and is located in this country: US. This item can be shipped to United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Denmark, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Finland, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Estonia, Australia, Greece, Portugal, Cyprus, Slovenia, Japan, China, Sweden, South Korea, Indonesia, Taiwan, South Africa, Thailand, Belgium, France, Hong Kong, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Italy, Germany, Austria, Bahamas, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Switzerland, Norway, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Republic of Croatia, Malaysia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Panama, Trinidad and Tobago, Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Jamaica, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Saint Kitts-Nevis, Saint Lucia, Montserrat, Turks and Caicos Islands, Barbados, Bangladesh, Bermuda, Brunei Darussalam, Bolivia, Ecuador, Egypt, French Guiana, Guernsey, Gibraltar, Guadeloupe, Iceland, Jersey, Jordan, Cambodia, Cayman Islands, Liechtenstein, Sri Lanka, Luxembourg, Monaco, Macau, Martinique, Maldives, Nicaragua, Oman, Peru, Pakistan, Paraguay, Reunion, Vietnam.


Louis Smith Jazz Trumpeter Report Card African American Blue Note Memphis